RIT Dyed Clothespins

Ritdyedclothespins4

An easy summer project to do by yourself or with the kids is to dye wood clothespins with RIT dye.  Over the years, I’ve amassed quite a few in different colors.  They’re so easy, fun and useful! I use them for everything from chip bags in the pantry to easy, quick styling around the house.

Rit dye boxes

Wood clothespins are getting harder to find, now that everything is going plastic.  I’ve seen new packages at TJMaxx, but I have better luck finding them at estate sales and church sales, or even the local small grocery store. Not many people take the time to dry their clothes on the line anymore, so often they can be found for pretty cheap!

Rit dye in bucket

To get started, you’ll need a plastic bucket (I use an ice cream bucket), a package of RIT dye in your desired color (powder or liquid), about 2 dozen wood clothespins, brown kraft grocery bag, paint stirrer or metal spoon. RIT can be found at local grocery stores and big box craft and discount stores.

This dye can stain, so be careful where you’re mixing it up!  Fill a plastic bucket 1/2 to 2/3 full of hot water from the tap and dissolve the package of RIT into it, stirring to dissolve granules.  Place clothespins in, pushing them down.  You’ll need to stir them every so often to equalize the color.  I just leave the bucket out in the grass for several hours & stir as I’m going about my day.  When the color gets to your desired shade, drain  the water and dry clothespins on a  brown kraft grocery bag (cut open).  Dried in the sun, the color just bakes into the wood.

Ritdyed3

Ritdyedclothespins4

Rit dye comes in so many colors, you can choose whatever color works into your design scheme!

For function, I use them on all my snack bags, baking items, etc.  Call me weird, but I don’t like the feel of metal or plastic clips.  I know I’m not the only weirdo out there that’s finicky…my sister-in-law gave me all her wood-handled kitchen utensils; she only likes plastic!

They worked wonderfully to attach all types of memory items for Happy Girl’s grad party {see “Junk Beautiful Photo and Memory Displays”}.

quilt bunting

For fun, they can be used to make quick and easy bunting for a party.  Grab some ribbon, some rope or twine, some paper, quilt squares, bandanas etc.  The clothespins keep each piece perfectly in place.

And if you store them in jars, you’ll have a little art display as well!

Rit dyed clothespins

RIT-dyed clothespins…a great summer project!  (Maybe you could get your kids to help organize the pantry with them 🙂

PinButton

RIT dyed clothespins

Sharing at these lovely parties:

To Grandma’s House We Go

Wow Us Wednesdays

Talk of the Town

The Scoop

Share Your Cup

Farmhouse Friday

DIY Salvaged Junk Projects


6 thoughts on “RIT Dyed Clothespins

  1. I use the wood clothes pins for snack bags also. I have had them for years and didn’t realize they are getting scarce. I did see small ones in the craft section at Walmart. Maybe I should start buying them when I see them. They look so pretty in the jars.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I put my clothespins in vinegar after the dying process to set the color so they don’t bleed onto anything if they get wet. Sometimes a light coat of spray poly is also part of my regimen.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s